How Many Watts Does a TV Use: All You Need to Know

Knowing the TV wattage is important to fix the electric bill and understand the power or energy efficiency. In the modern era, TV is used for multiple purposes, not only watching. 

So, the question is how many watts does a TV use. 

It depends on the TV size, resolution, and other important technology. A standard TV uses around 58.6 watts in turned-on and standby mode is 1.3 watts. The power consumption rates of the recent TVs are 10W to 117W and 0.5W to 3W on standby. And, per year consuming electricity is approx 106.9 kWh. 

how many watts does a tv use

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You would like to read the full article to understand details including some vital questions and answers, comparison chart of different sizes TVs Watts.

Basic Things of the TV Wattage

TV wattage is the unit of the measurement of strength or power of a TV, just like measuring the height in feet & inches and weight in kilograms or pounds. Don’t think it is related to the car battery watts. 

Here, 1 kilowatt is equal to 1000 watts. From 80 watt to 400 watt TV available in the market. This value is related to the size of your TV. The most common size is 33 inch, 44 inch, 56 inches, and so on depending on the TV, CRT, LCD, LED, QLED, Plasma, and more. 

Now, we share here a table of the most common TV sizes along with the several brands and watts chart to get a rough idea on this matter.

TV SIZELCD TV WATTAGELED TV WATTAGE
15 Inch TV 18 Watts 15 Watts 
17 Inch TV20 Watts18 Watts 
19 Inch TV 22 Watts20 Watts 
20 inch TV26 Watts24 Watts 
21 Inch TV30 Watts 26 Watts 
22 Inch TV40 Watts30 Watts
24 Inch TV50 Watts 35 Watts 
30 Inch TV60 Watts 38 Watts 
32 Inch TV70 Watts 41 Watts 
37 Inch TV80 Watts44 Watts 
40 Inch TV100 Watts 50 Watts 
42 Inch TV120 Watts 57 Watts 
50 Inch TV150 Watts 72 Watts 
55 Inch TV180 Watts80 Watts 
60 Inch TV200 Watts88 Watts

Ultimately, these are the common and general guidelines about TV watts. The actual power of wattage is presented on the back of your TV just like a small silver sticker. This way is better to know how many watts does a TV use. 

How Many Watts Does a TV Use

There are some specific opinions on the watts that TV uses. On average, the modern standby power TVs use the range of 0.5 to 2 watts or 1.3 watts daily.

 On the other hand, if you calculate the per year or annual electricity, you get another thing, 106.9kWh. The average cost per year is $16.04. Unplug the power of the TV if you do not use it regularly. 

When TV is on, the around wattage of the most popular brands is 117 watts. They consume 206kWh of electricity annually. The average per year cost is $30.90 when TV is on. Nowadays, modern LED and LCD TVs are more efficient than the older CRT and plasma or other TVs. 

You know, these wattages vary in the TV’s screen size and resolution.

For example, Spectre E18 TV uses a low amount of watts while On just uses 10 watts and standby uses 0.5 watts. 

So, any modern TV can use 58.6 watts when running. Again, when standby, it uses 1.3 watts. The most common type of TV wattage in the On mode is 117 watts and standby mode consumption is 0.5. It is nearly impossible to avoid the resolution, screen size, and other important factors to understand how many watts a TV uses. Here is a table to break down all your confusion about TV wattage. 

TV Size Result Category Watts used while On Watts used on Standby Annual electricity consumption
19 Inch TVMost Common16.9W0.5W33 kWh
Average16.5W0.5W32.43 kWh
Lowest15W0.5W28.8 kWh
24 Inch TV Most Common20.0W0.5W38.1 kWh
Average19.8W0.8W38.09 kWh
32 Inch TV Most Common26W0.5W51 kWh
Average28W0.7W53.81 kWh
40 Inch Average34.1W0.5W64.6 kWh
43 Inch TV Most Common34W0.5W112 kWh
Average47.8W 0.9W82.96 kWh
50 Inch TVMost Common74W3W136 kWh 
Average70.5W2.1W130.95 kWh
55 Inch TV Most Common82W0.5W151 kWh 
Average77W1.4W140.85 kWh
Lowest62.9W0.5W92 kWh
65 Inch TV Most Common98.3W0.5W185 kWh
Average94.7W1.1W169.47 kWh
Lowest72W0.5W101 kWh
70 Inch TV Average109.1W0.5W205 kWh

How Many Watts Does a 55-inch LED TV Use?

One of the most common TV models is 55-inch LED TV although many homeowners like to use 60-inch or larger models to get more efficiency. 

Generally, 55-inch LED TV has consumption power from 60 to 90 watts, where an average of 80 watts. Again, 55-inch OLED wattage is 105 to 110 watts. 

The best way is to check the label on the TV’S back to find the actual power of the TV.

How Much Power Does a 32-inch LED TV Use?

If you want to use the TV for guests, children, and dorm rooms, you can go through the 32-inch LED TV. This popular size is compact, cheap, and lightweight so it is easy to carry. 

This 32″ LED TV comes from 30 to 55 watts while the average watts is 40. Alternatively, 32-inch LCD TV has 50 to 85 watts whereas the most common is 65 to 70 watts. Plus, 32″ OLED around watts 55 to 60. But the Samsung 32 inches LED TV has an  average of 35 watts and a resolution ‎of 1366 x768. 

How Much Power Does a 65 inch TV Use?

Two different modes of watts are not similar. If the 65 inch TV is On, its watts are 98.3. In standby mode, it has 0.5 watts. The per year electricity of the 65″ TV is around 169.47 kWh. 

How Many Watts is a 4K TV?

A 4K TV uses 80 watts when keeps On mode. On-standby 4K TVs use 0.6 watts. 

Conclusion

So, today the ultra-high-definition TVs are used mostly which consume further electricity than the previous models. On average, most of the TVs use 80 to 400 watts while they are activated although it is dependent on the size and technology. The average cost is 13¢ per kilowatt-hour.

However, you have already known all the expected information from this article. And, our comparison table helped you find out everything about TV Wattage within a short time. Now, it is clear how many watts a TV uses.

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About This Writer

Liam Jaxon Author pic

Hi, I am responsible for the 'Homeowners Power Solutions' category. My name is Liam Jaxon and a licensed technician with 7 years of experience in vehicle batteries, electrical gadgets, and home appliances. My working experience in different residential & light commercial electrical sectors and the automobile industry helped to acquire vast knowledge in this industry.

Hi, I am responsible for the 'Homeowners Power Solutions' category. My name is Liam Jaxon and a licensed technician with 7 years of experience in vehicle batteries, electrical gadgets, and home appliances. My working experience in different residential & light commercial electrical sectors and the automobile industry helped to acquire vast knowledge in this industry.

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