What Is a Spud Wrench? Difference Between Spud and Pipe Wrench?

difference between spud and pipe wrench

Spud Wrench

A spud wrench is a wrench with a tapered spike on one end and an adjustable or conventional box wrench on the other. The spike can be used to line up bolt holes while installing pipe fittings, doing automotive repair, or lining up bolt holes in girders and beams in the case of ironworkers. For improved leverage or access to parts, some include offset handles. Other sorts of wrenches go by the name “spud,” so be sure you know what you’re getting before you hand over your cash.

Why Is It Called a Spud Wrench?

The majority of toilets at the time had spuds, which were pipes. With its long thin handle, this adjustable wrench was made to fit the nut on a spud pipe. This made it possible for plumbers to repair the pipe by removing it. Read more: Finding Ratcheting Wrench Set Made in USA

What Does a Spud Look Like?

The word “spud” is derived from the Irish. To dig up potatoes, they used a small dagger or knife known as a spud. Because the wrench’s end resembled a knife, the nickname spud was coined. Connect and move it from within using a spud wrench designed to go inside a bolt or similar item.

Does a Spud Wrench Have Smooth Jaws?

The 12″ spud wrench has smooth, toothed jaws that fit into small spaces and are suitable for square or rectangular material.

How Long Is a Spud Wrench?

Standard Combination Wrenches (1/4, 5/16, 11/32, 3/8, 7/16, 1/2, 9/16, 5/8, 11/16, 3/4, 13/16, 7/8, 15/16, 1) Metric Combination Wrenches (1/4, 5/16, 11/32, 3/8, 7/16, 1/2, 9/16, 5/8, 11/16, 3/4, 13/16, 7/8, 15/16, 1) (6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19) 3/8, 7/16, 1/2, 9/16, 5/8, 11/16, 3/4, 7/8, 9/16, 5/8, 11/16, 3/4, 7/8, 9/16, 5/8, 11/16, 3/4, 7/8, 9/16, 5/8, 11/16, 3/4, 7/8, 9/16, It’s worth noting that one wrench can mix two sizes.

How Do You Size a Wrench?

To figure out what size wrench you’ll need, you’ll need to first measure your bolt. Take the bolt’s diameter and multiply it by 1.5. This conversion factor and computation work for both metric and standard bolt sizes. The size of the wrench you’ll need to appropriately adjust the bolt will be determined by the resultant number.

Pipe Wrench

Wrench for pipes In certain regions, the plumber wrench, which is frequently used on pipelines, is also referred to as a pipe wrench.

It was founded in 1869 and is still in use today. The pipe wrench was designed by Daniel C. Stillson as a tool for plumbers to connect or disconnect two pipes. This heavy-duty wrench features an adjustable hook and jaw, allowing a plumber to seal it around a variety of pipes.

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What Are the Uses of a Pipe Wrench?

A pipe wrench’s main function is to hold and spin a soft pipe or fixture, which might occasionally incorporate large hardware that a crescent wrench or set of pliers couldn’t handle. Pipe wrenches are available in a variety of sizes, which are usually marked on the wrench handle.

What Are the Uses of a Spud Wrench?

The purpose of a spud wrench is to loosen and tighten a portion of pipe found on older toilets. A spud wrench’s most distinguishing characteristic is its tapered spike, which may be used for a variety of tasks such as aligning bolt holes while installing pipe fittings or aligning bolt holes for girders and beams in ironworking.

What Is a Spud Wrench Made of?

Spud wrenches, as previously said, are durable tools. Alloy steel has traditionally been used in its construction. The jaws of a Spud wrench are exceptionally robust, allowing you to release even the most difficult nuts. Plumbers need all the torque aid they can get since they work in small areas.

What Is a Pipe Wrench Made Out of?

Pipe wrenches are often composed of iron or aluminum. Aluminum pipe wrenches are lighter than iron-bodied pipe wrenches, but they cannot take as much torque.

Difference Between Spud and Pipe Wrench

The Spud wrench has a smooth jaw that can grab nuts and bolts, but the pipe wrench’s gripping hook jaw and weight make it a superior fastener.

The Spud Wrench is mostly used in vehicle mechanic work for changing oil filters and aligning bolt holes, whereas the pipe wrench is primarily used in plumbing work but may also be used in automobile maintenance, particularly on mufflers.

The Spud wrench has a smooth jaw that can grab nuts and bolts, but the pipe wrench’s gripping hook jaw and weight make it a superior fastener.

The spud wrench resembles an adjustable wrench on one side and has a tapered spike on the other. The tapered spike end is typically used to line up bolt holes while installing pipe fittings.

The pipe wrench, like its progenitor the monkey wrench, has a long, thick, heavy bar that aids fitting support by providing the operator with the maximum amount of torque possible.

Bottom Line

The spud wrench’s simplicity and adaptability make it a useful tool for tightening or loosening bolts, nuts, and fasteners. The spike end can also be used to align holes in heavier pieces and materials, making it easier to join them.

Although spud wrenches and pipe wrenches appear to be similar, there are substantial distinctions between them. The pipe wrench, like its progenitor the monkey wrench, has a long, thick, heavy bar that aids fitting support by providing the operator with the maximum amount of torque possible.

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About This Writer

David Rowan Author

Hello, I am David Rowan. I am a professional contractor with 10 years of experience in home building, different tools used, construction, home remodeling, and other home improvement work. I have already built many custom homes and continued to do several woodworking projects along with how to deal with all categories of tools.

Hello, I am David Rowan. I am a professional contractor with 10 years of experience in home building, different tools used, construction, home remodeling, and other home improvement work. I have already built many custom homes and continued to do several woodworking projects along with how to deal with all categories of tools.

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